Home Care Assistance Waterloo Wellington Partners With MAREP to Present Discussion on Ontario Dementia Strategy - Home Care AssistanceHome Care AssistanceHome Care Assistance Waterloo Wellington Partners With MAREP to Present Discussion on Ontario Dementia Strategy | Home Care Assistance

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Kathryn Zakskorn
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Home Care Assistance Waterloo Wellington Partners With MAREP to Present Discussion on Ontario Dementia Strategy

In line with their mission to change the way the world ages, Home Care Assistance Waterloo partnered with Murray Alzheimer Research and Education Program (MAREP) to present discussion on Ontario Dementia Strategy

(Waterloo, Ontario – January 27, 2017) Home Care Assistance Waterloo Wellington, the trusted provider of in-home care for seniors, partnered with Murray Alzheimer Research and Education Program and presented an event themed, “What will the future hold? Developing an Ontario Dementia Strategy”.

The Keynote Speaker on Ontario Dementia Strategy was Michael Robertson, Director Capacity Planning and Priorities Branch, Ministry of Health & Long-term Care. There was a panel discussion on dementia strategy led by Phyllis Fehr, person living with dementia & ODAG Board Member, Carole Johannesson, person living with dementia & ODAG Board Member, Mary Beth Wighton, person living with dementia & ODAG Board Member and Guy Chadsey, family partner in care & Alzheimer Society of Perth

Board Member.

In 2016 there were an estimated 564,000 Canadians living with dementia, with 25,000 new cases diagnosed every year. By 2031 that number is expected to rise to 937,000, an increase of 66 per cent.1

There are currently over 1.1 million Canadians are affected directly or indirectly by the disease.

Dementia is a group of conditions that affect the brain and cause problems with memory, thinking, speaking or performing familiar tasks. These problems gradually worsen over time and interfere with a person’s ability to carry out daily activities and to live independently. Alzheimer’s disease is the leading form of dementia.

While living with dementia can be challenging, it is important to remember that dementia does not change who a person is. Many people with dementia are capable of pursuing their interests, making decisions about their health, maintaining relationships and aging well. It is with this in mind that Ontario is committed to developing a comprehensive, forward-looking dementia care strategy.2

Dementia can have a substantial impact on families, friends, care partners, and people living with dementia. For example, caregiving responsibilities can lead to high levels of stress and people living with dementia may experience stigma and increased dependency. Being a family caregiver can be a rewarding experience, but can also take an enormous physical, emotional and financial toll on a person. Enabling care partners to live well means ensuring that they are supported in their caregiving responsibilities and in maintaining their health and independence.2

“At Home Care Assistance we understand the challenges faced by a family caregiver,” said Angie Kunnath, Chief Operating Officer of Home Care Assistance Waterloo & Wellington. “Our common objective is to raise awareness around the support system that exists for people living with Alzheimer ’s disease and related dementias. Home Care Assistance’s mission is to change the way the world ages through innovative offerings such as our proprietary Balance Care Method™, which is based on scientifically studies lifestyles of the longest living people on Earth, and our Cognitive Therapeutics Method™, a research-based activities program to promote brain health.”

Currently there is no cure for the disease but treatments for symptoms and interventions to slow disease progression are available, improving quality of life for Alzheimer’s or dementia sufferers, as well as their caregivers. To this end, Home Care Assistance developed the Cognitive Therapeutics Method™, a cognitive stimulation program that promotes brain health. The program focuses on cognitive activities that target the five primary cognitive domains as well as coping strategies, sensory engagement, social skills, recreation, exercise and diet to enhance quality of life. Home Care Assistance caregivers are trained in the Method so that clients receive one-on-one mental stimulation as well as support with basic care and activities of daily living.

For more information about Home Care Assistance Waterloo, visit www.HomeCareAssistanceWaterloo.ca or call 519-954-2111 to speak with a care manager. The office is located at 324 Highland Rd W, Unit 12A in Kitchener, Ontario.

ABOUT HOME CARE ASSISTANCE

Home Care Assistance is the leading provider of home care for seniors across the United States, Canada and Australia. We provide older adults with quality care that enables them to live happier, healthier lives at home. Our services are distinguished by the caliber of our caregivers, the responsiveness of our staff and our expertise in daily care. We embrace a positive, balanced approach to aging centered on the evolving needs of older adults. A 2017 Inc. 5000 Company and one of the 50 fastest growing women-owned companies worldwide in 2016, Home Care Assistance’s CEO Lily Sarafan was also named Health Care Executives’ 2016 Woman of the Year. For more information about Home Care Assistance, visit http://www.homecareassistance.com.

References:

1 http://www.alzheimer.ca/en/Get-involved/Raise-your-voice/Latest-info-stats

2 Ontario Dementia Strategy Discussion Paper, Ministry of Health and Long Term Care

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