Vitamin C cures fast aging mice from Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Failure, and High Cholesterol. | Home Care Assistance Vitamin C cures fast aging mice from Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Failure, and High Cholesterol. | Home Care Assistance
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Vitamin C cures fast aging mice from Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Failure, and High Cholesterol.

-Dr. Kathy Johnson, PhD, CMC

In new research, published in the FASEB Journal, mice having abnormalities caused by Werner syndrome gene, also known as accelerated aging, including cancer, obesity, diabetes, heart failure and high cholesterol, can be cured through Vitamin C.

The issue of January 2010 reported the research conducted by a team of Canadian scientists showing that in a mouse model with Werner’s syndrome, vitamin C stops as well as reverses accelerated aging; however, the discovery may also be applicable to other progeroid syndromes.

In their 20s, people with Werner’s syndrome begin showing signs of accelerated aging and develop age-related diseases. Before the age of 50, they usually die.

The co-author of the study from the Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie in Quebec, Canada, Michel Lebel, Ph. D., stated that there is a noticeable indication in the study that in order to increase their lifespan, healthy individuals do not require a huge amount of vitamin C, particularly when they exercise and have a balanced diet.

He also mentions that an individual may profit from a diet with suitable amount of vitamin C when he/she has a mutation in the WRN gene or any gene affected by the WRN protein and therefore predisposes them to several age-related diseases. Both normal mice as well as mice with a mutation in the gene responsible for Werner’s syndrome (WRN gene) are treated with vitamin C in drinking water by scientists.

The mice with a mutated WRN gene were fat, diabetic and developed heart disease and cancer before treatment; however, they were as healthy as normal mice and lived a normal lifespan after treatment.

In WRN mice, vitamin C, in addition, enhanced the manner, in which the mice stored and burned fat, reduced tissue inflammation and oxidative stress. Nevertheless, vitamin C did not help the healthy mice.

The Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal, Gerald Weissmann, M.D. affirmed that in the medicine cabinets and food, vitamin C has become one of the most misconstrued substances.

In addition, he stated that in this study and others similar to his, it is explained how and why this chemical can assist to shield some and indeed not all individuals from premature aging.

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